Career Development Blog

The Making of a Remarkable Lawyer

You went to law school for three or four years, working hard to become a lawyer.  You are ready to start and actually prove how great you are.  No one would fault you for this goal; great lawyers are honest, dependable, hard working, intelligent, and proactive. In reality, you can stay at the great lawyer level and probably have a good practice and earn a good salary.  But what about the next step? How do you move from great to remarkable?  The short answer can be summed up in the title of Marshal Goldsmith’s book, “What Got You Here Won’t Get You There”.  Simply stated, to become remarkable or memorable, you need new skills and qualities to get you to the next step.  These skills and qualities may not be easy to define but they make a great impact. The following list will get you started.

Qualities of Remarkable Attorneys:

  1. They are able to think on their feet, adapting to changing situations on a dime.  They are willing to do what it takes to get things done.
  2. They are a little bit quirky, sometimes irreverent but they are fun.  They are not afraid to be different, usually thinking outside of the box and coming up with new solutions to old problems.
  3. When a challenge shows up or a situation becomes stressful, they are able to drop their individuality and become a team player.
  4. They believe in balance. Remarkable lawyers know when to play and when to work. They know when to challenge and when to back off.
  5. They praise in public.  It is one thing to be praised by your boss but it is quite different to be praised by a peer.
  6. They never complain in public. If they do complain, it is in private, out of the office, and only to a person with whom they would trust their life.
  7. They are bold. They are not afraid to speak up when others remain silent.  They recognize the problems and issues of their colleagues  and are not afraid to bring them up in a meeting.
  8. They like to prove others wrong.    They are driven by something more personal than just the desire to do a good job.  When told that they can’t do something, they work hard to prove that they can.
  9. They always refine or modify strategies or processes that are outdated but continue to be used. Remarkable lawyers make antiquated processes even better by listening to others and applying that information to make changes where needed.

Do you have what it takes to be a remarkable, memorable attorney?  You will never know if you do not try.

Short URL: http://blogs.law.widener.edu/cdo/?p=539

Posted by on Apr 18 2012. Filed under Alerts, Building a Leader, Emotional Intelligence, Leadership. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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