Archive

Posts Tagged ‘apply’

Application Deadline May 15

May 9th, 2011 No comments

It’s been a while!  The Admissions office is busy preparing for the new class and continuing to read files.  Remember our deadline to apply is May 15!  Take advantage of our free application through our website to be considered for Fall 2011.  We will accept a June LSAT score, visit LSAC.org for registration information.

Lately, I’ve received many questions from applicants who were not offered a seat this year.  First, remember that you can achieve your goals with dedication and persistence.  Work hard for what you seek.  Secondly, the Committee carefully reviews every application in its entirety.  However, your LSAT score and undergraduate GPA are significant when making a decision.  They are an objective way for the Committee to gauge your skill level.  Although these scores are not directly pertaining to law, they do indicate your level of reasoning and scholarly potential.  If your scores do not approach our medians, admission will be more challenging.  A strong personal statement, persuasive letters of recommendation and supporting materials can help offset lower scores.  Additionally, if you have any weaknesses in your file then address them in an addendum, or separate statement.  You may email any supporting documents to lawadmissions@widener.edu to add to your file.

As another application season winds down, we will continue to offer events and guidance for the entering class.  I welcome any questions or comments, please email me at asdelpuerto@widener.edu.

Stand Out From the Crowd

February 22nd, 2011 2 comments

It’s the height of application season and making your application stand out can be challenging.  Here are a few points to consider:

What were your accomplishments?

You want to highlight your strengths in your personal statement. Try not to summarize your resume or extracurricular activities.  What makes you different and extraordinary?  What is most meaningful in your life?  How does this relate to law school?  Discuss any weaknesses or standardized scores in a separate statement, NOT in the personal statement.

Who knows you well academically and/or professionally?

Does this person write well?  Can he or she provide specific examples of your outstanding abilities?  Never rely on a well known name or persona for a good recommendation.  A mentor or coworker might provide more detail than a Senator.

Did you get to the point?

Review all of your documents; remember that Admissions Committees are reviewing hundreds of applications a week.  Be concise, be precise, be coherent.  Can you easily skim your statements?  How long do they take to read?  Always ask others to edit your documents and ask for a general overview.  How do others describe your statement in a word or sentence?  Were there any sentences they had to review for clarity?

Although scores are a vital factor to your application, asking yourself these questions can give you an edge.

Also, remember that Widener Law’s admissions process is paperless.  Please apply through lsac.org or law.widener.edu and we will request your LSAC CAS report upon receiving your application.  Every applicant must register through our website portal, law.widener.edu/admissions, to receive a decision.

As always, please contact me with any questions or concerns, asdelpuerto@mail.widener.edu.  Good luck!

New Year, New Applicants!

August 24th, 2010 No comments

Classes are in session and our new class is officially inaugurated.  We wish our incoming and current students the best of luck!  A brand new year brings a brand new admission season.

This year, we transitioned into a paperless format.  That means that you can apply online for free beginning in September.  Our portal is comprehensive and walks you through each step of the admission process.  We will also be traveling the country answering your questions and offering advice.  Check out the events calendar to see if we will be near you!

Additionally, I came across some excellent articles starting on page 32 of the latest PreLaw Magazine issue.  The articles “Law School Admission Secrets”, “6 Big Mistakes” and “4 Common Admissions Myths” all offer the same advice I give applicants.  These are broad comments that apply to most schools so take advantage of the quotes from the experts!

As always please do not hesitate to contact me as you tackle law school admissions!

What does a good application look like?

August 14th, 2009 3 comments

Widener Law prides itself in holistic file reviews.  However, the four aspects that most influence the committee are:

  • Undergraduate GPA
  • LSAT score
  • Personal Statement
  • Letters of Recommendation

Your GPA and LSAT are very important to the Admissions Committee because they offer a relatively objective measurement of your skills.  Make sure to work hard and prepare so you are at the most competitive spot possible.  If you are not a good test taker, become one.  Take prep courses, find a tutor and/or seek counseling if you suffer test anxiety.  Law school is largely based on tests so start improving your skills now!

Your personal statement and letters of recommendation show the committee who you are and what you offer to the school.  Personal statements should be concise and well formatted.  Provide information on your work ethic, scholarly potential and any other traits that set you apart from the rest of the applicant pool.

Letters of recommendation should be detailed and well written.  Develop an idea of what you would like a recommender to write about you and ask if the writer can meet your needs.  If not, seek another recommender.  Quality is more important than prestige.  Do not use a recommendation just because of the writer’s reputation; always opt for the person who can write most positively about you.

I will hopefully go into more detail about each of these components in later blogs.  For now, keep up your hard work and feel free to contact me with questions!