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What to Do During Your Law School Visit

August 17th, 2012 No comments

As we start a new school year, some of you may be scheduling campus visits as you apply.  Here’s a few suggestions to make the most out of a visit.

  • Do your homework first

I understand that some people prefer talking to someone rather than doing research.  But you give off a much better impression toAdmissions representatives if you visit a law school knowing the basics.  Research is a major aspect of law school after all, show that you are already savvy with it.  Take a look at Widener Law’s website before you stop by.  All of our application requirements and procedures are listed there.  Create an account through our portal and see what the process looks like.  Also, visit lsac.org for information about the LSAT and creating a Credential Assembly Service (CAS) report.  These are the basic application procedures.

  •  You interview us, not the other way around

Widener Law does not interview applicants so do not consider a visit as an interview for Admission.  No, a campus visit will not sway the Committee’s decision.  We will gladly help improve your application but any requests for reconsideration or clarification should be submitted in writing (email or letter).

On the other hand, this is your opportunity to gauge whether Widener Law is a good fit for you.  Make a list of questions that you feel are important and ask them during your visit.  If anything is unclear, ask again!  We are here to give you a full picture of our programs and atmosphere.   About.com has a good list of questions to ask, but ask anything you want!  If your tour guide can’t answer a questions, then someone else probably can.  Feel free to request another contact for further information.

  •  When should you visit?

Widener Law welcomes visitors any time of the year.  But I usually suggest waiting until you receive a decision.  I recommend applying to a wide variety of law schools (if you can afford it).  After receiving piles of acceptances (hopefully), narrow down your most likely choices.  Then visit those schools.

  • Meet students, faculty, staff, etc.

Visit a class, request to meet a student, stop by our cafeteria (Crown Court) and stroll through the library on your own.  Make sure to meet as many people as you can to get an accurate picture of student life.  We regularly schedule class visits and have an active Student Ambassador group to answer your questions.  US News offers a great suggestion:

“During your visit, try not to let the awe-inspiring (or underwhelming) facilities distract you; stay focused on what really matters. While a grandiose library may be impressive, pay closer attention to how happy and collaborative the students are and how involved they are in the school and in extracurricular activities. Is there a sense of community, both within the law school and within the broader university?”

  • Don’t rush to judgement

Just as when you visited colleges (if you didn’t then, you should visit law schools now), don’t rush to judgement.  I was highly disillusioned with my college visit.  It was a dreary, rainy day.  The campus was enormous and overwhelming.  The food was barely edible.  The location was not exactly “happening”.  And I had trouble really seeing myself there.  Despite the visit, they had great programs and a good price so I chose that school anyway.  I had some of the best years of my life there and I would choose that school again – I’m glad I didn’t rush to judgement!  Sometimes visits don’t give an accurate picture of three or four years worth of education.  Weigh your options.  We all have bad days, classes are not always lively and interesting, and rainy days happen.  Remember what’s important and take visits into account along with the bigger picture.

  • Now you’re ready to stop by!  

I hope you can all take a look at both the Harrisburg and Delaware campuses.  They both offer more than just a building, it’s an entire community.  For the full experience, call 717-541-3903 to visit the Harrisburg campus or 302-477-2100 to visit the Delaware campus or email lawadmissions@widener.edu.  Further details are available on our website.

What do you think?  What additional advice can you offer?  Comment below!

Happy Holidays!

December 10th, 2010 No comments

As the semester winds down, I wish you all the best in your finals and papers.  If you’re not currently in school, I wish you luck in navigating through those packed malls.  The Delaware campus is situated in the heart of the tax-free shopping district and traffic doubles during this time of year!  For the rest of the year, it is a convenient location for corporations and organizations due to the tax laws.  Interested in this legal specialty?  Read more about our Corporate Law Institute.

Happy holidays and see you in 2011!

Are you a veteran?

March 29th, 2010 No comments

Widener Law is committed to developing programs and initiatives supporting veterans. Some of these include the Veteran’s Law Clinic,Yellow Ribbon Campaign, GI Bill benefits, speaker series, JAG recruitment and alumni networking.  The Admissions Office appreciates your service and I welcome your questions and concerns.  As our network grows, so do our program offerings.  We can put you in touch with current students, graduates and professors with similar interests.

Please visit the Veteran’s Resources site for more information and details.

Environmental Law and Policy Certificate

January 14th, 2010 No comments

Widener Law’s Environmental Law initiatives will be broadened through our new certificate in Environmental Law and Policy on the Delaware campus. Recently, Widener developed an Environmental Law Center combining the expertise of faculty and administrators on both campuses. The goals include:

▪ Studying, making proposals for and evaluating the implementation of environmental, energy and climate-change programs in Pennsylvania and Delaware at the state and municipal levels.

▪ Developing, advocating for and evaluating innovative laws and legal proposals relating to the environment, energy and climate change. This will be done by putting on conferences open to the public and through faculty research and writing.

▪ Helping public and private decision makers solve legal problems relating to environment, energy and climate change.

▪ Collaborating with other higher-education institutions on environmental, energy and climate-change matters.

Widener Law continues to develop programs to better our environment and community. We hope you are willing to join us in this endeavor.   If you have questions about our environmental law programs, please contact Professor John Dernbach, jcdernbach@widener.edu, on the Harrisburg campus or Professor Jim May, jrmay@widener.edu, on the Delaware campus.