Grappling With Your LSAT Score

December LSAT results were released recently, how did you score?  I received several calls from applicants disappointed with their scores.  Hopefully, you conquered each question but here are some suggestions for those who fell short:

  1. A low LSAT score is not the end of the world. Passion, drive and dedication can get you places – so think positive.
  2. Reflect on your preparation. Did you take the time to adequately prepare for the LSAT?  We advise preparing at least 3 months in advance and timing yourself once you start taking full prep tests. If you prepared solo, would a class help?  If you took a class, was your teacher effective?  Maybe a tutor would give the personal attention you need?
  3. Reflect on your health. How did you feel mentally and physically during the test?  Were you blanking out?  Anxious?  Consider seeking a counselor that can develop skills to counteract test anxiety.  It is completely natural to feel pressured with this test, it means a lot to your future.  But if your anxiety is overwhelming and affecting your score then it’s time to take action, find someone who can give you coping mechanisms.  Illness, not getting enough sleep, hunger, headaches and lack of concentration can all affect your score – keep healthy.
  4. What’s your next step? You can apply with your current score or retake the test.  Keeping your score can be an option if it lies close to the median for the entering class.  Academic records, personal statements and letters of recommendation can influence the Admissions Committee’s decision, so beef those up!  Some schools, like Widener, also offer trial admission programs for applicants with slightly lower scores but otherwise excellent applications.  If you feel that your score could increase, then retaking is a good option.  Consider your timing, the LSAT is only offered four times per year so you may need to wait another year to start law school.  Also consider your likelihood of increasing your score.  If you felt healthy, confident and thoroughly prepared then scores rarely increase more than a point or so (although there are always exceptions).

I hope this offers some advice to those of you grappling with a tough decision.  If you’re still unsure, feel free to email me at asdelpuerto@mail.widener.edu with questions.

And happy 2011!

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